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By Grant Dionne

OCD stands for obsessive compulsive disorder. Many people believe that OCD is something that it’s not. Many people believe that OCD is just wanting to keep things tidy and neat. Others use it as an adjective. For example, they might say “that was so OCD”.

People might think that’s what OCD is but it’s not. OCD is much much more. I have OCD so I would know. OCD is triggered by stress, and as a result people with OCD start to worry. There are many worries associated with OCD some can be being tidy and neat, while others can be worrying you upset someone, disappointing your parents, contamination (feeling you touched something and then worrying about getting sick or having germs on you) but in hindsight you always have germs on you, scrupulosity (worry based on upsetting your religion), etc. I could go on and on about what people with OCD worry about.

The way to feel better about something is live with the uncertainty reassuring about the worry will just make the matters worse next time. Even though you try to get the worries out of your head OCD keeps telling you the opposite of what something should be. I like to imagine as a little person on your shoulder like in the cartoons that says “how do you know?” “how do you know?”

OCD can affect the way people feel, talk, and think. It can also distract people on what they are doing. It does this by enveloping you in so much worry that you are consumed by it and can’t concentrate. It also impacts how you think about yourself. For example, if you worry about upsetting someone or your parents then you might think your a bad person because OCD tells you that, and it keeps telling you that.

OCD can confuse people, especially people with OCD because no matter what people tell you OCD is still there to antagonize you. But there are ways to treat it and can be brought down to a lower level you just have to work towards it. This why I believe OCD is a tricky thing to deal with.

Grant Dionne is 13 years old. When he’s not at school he enjoys swimming competitively, Boy Scouts, and comics.

3 Comments

  • Grant Dionne

    Thank you so much IOCDF

    Reply
    • Lori

      Grant – thanks for sharing your story! It has helped me better understand what my son feels as a person with OCD.

      Reply
  • Maureen

    Thank you for sharing your story Grant. I am hoping that my 13 year old daughter will get to a place where she is comfortable sharing her story as well.

    Reply

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